Tag Archives: right to be forgotten

Google-JapanDoraemon

Shhh… Japan’s “Forget” Ruling on Google

The Tokyo District Court ordered Google Japan last Thursday to follow Europe’s recent “right to be forgotten” ruling and remove the search results of a Japanese man’s past relations with a criminal organization following his complaint of violation into his privacy.

According to the judge preceding the case, some of the Google results “infringe personal rights” and had harmed the plaintiff.

The European Court of Justice ruled in May that anyone living in the European Union and Europeans living outside the region could ask search engines to remove links if they believed the online contents breached their right to privacy and are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed.”

But despite the uproar and headlines in the aftermath, the dirty little secret is that nothing has really changed. What Google has effectively done is to remove results from name search of those names approved to be deleted but only on its European websites. The same results remain on the Google US homepage and all its non-European sites.

Furthermore, Google is only removing the results but not the links. Its European sites may have deleted the results for a search on a specific name but a search for the same name accompanied by other key words may still churn out the same results.

In an earlier Shhh-cretly column, I explained with examples why there is a limit on the extent of privacy and any attempt to manually and selectively remove the Google search contents, successful or otherwise, is like playing God.

GoogleHacked

Shhh… iCloud Hack Victims to Sue Google for $100 million

Photo credit: http://www.pitstopmedia.com/

Hollywood lawyer Marty Singer, of Los Angeles-based law firm Lavely & Singer, has written to Google chairman Eric Schmidt and founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin threatening to sue Google for US$100 million if the US search giant failed to remove the naked photos of their clients that were recently hacked and posted online.

Their clients include a dozen of Hollywood celebrities like Kate Upton, Amber Heard, Rihanna, Jennifer Lawrence, Ariana Grande and Cara Delevingne whose nude photos have been hacked and distributed online after hackers took advantage of a flaw in Apple’s password recovery system to gain access to their iCloud accounts.

Singer has accused Google of “blatantly unethical behavior” – as takedown requests were sent to the company days after the photos were leaked but those images remained on YouTube and blogs – and its failure “to act expeditiously, and responsibly to remove the images, but in knowingly accommodating, facilitating, and perpetuating the unlawful conduct. Google is making millions and profiting from the victimization of women”.

“The seriousness of this matter cannot be overstated. If Google continues to thumb its nose at my clients’ rights – and continues to both allow and facilitates the further victimization of these women – and disregards the demands of this letter, it does so at its own peril,” according to the letter (see below).

Google is no stranger to takedown requests.

A landmark ruling that originated from a Spanish court has led the European Court of Justice to rule last May that anyone living in the European Union and Europeans living outside the region could ask search engines to remove links if they believed the online contents breached their right to privacy and are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed”.

Following this controversial European “right to be forgotten” ruling, Google has started removing results from its search engine since late June.

Hacked celebrities threaten to sue

TimBerners-Lee

Shhh… Tim Berners-Lee on the Web & Privacy

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the web 25 years ago and director of the World Wide Web Consortium, spoke at the Web We Want Festival last Saturday whereby he, according to The Guardian, also called on Saturday for a bill of rights that would guarantee the independence of the internet and ensure users’ privacy.

“If a company can control your access to the internet, if they can control which websites they go to, then they have tremendous control over your life,” the British computer scientist said. “If a government can block you going to, for example, the opposition’s political pages, then they can give you a blinkered view of reality to keep themselves in power.

“Suddenly the power to abuse the open internet has become so tempting both for government and big companies.”

Below is Tim Berners-Lee at a TED Talk earlier this year.

Europe’s Ruling on Google: Much Ado About Nothing

Europe’s Ruling on Google: Much Ado About Nothing

Forget-me-not

“More than once, I’ve wished my real life had a delete key.” – Harlan Coben, American novelist.

If that sounds familiar, it has now become a reality but with reasons for concern – it has been two months since the controversial European “right to be forgotten” ruling. The irony is that nothing has actually changed fundamentally despite all the subsequent hoo-hah.

Let’s not forget the internet was originally designed to exchange raw data between researchers and scientists. Any attempt to manually and selectively remove the contents, successful or otherwise, is like playing God – much worse when Google decides what to delete.

I have listed an example to illustrate the lessons to be learned and price to be paid – of a somewhat similar attempt and the implications on the society at large.

You can find the entire column here.

Post-Snowden, the US Reaps a Security Whirlwind

Post-Snowden, the US Reaps a Security Whirlwind

From China with Love

It’s the one year anniversary of what is now known as the Snowden revelations, which appeared on June 5 and June 9 when The Guardian broke news of classified National Security Agency documents and Edward Snowden revealed himself in Hong Kong as the source of those leaks.

There is still much to decipher from the chronology of events in the aftermath and the sudden global awakening to the end of privacy. Among the impacts on the personal, business and political fronts, one interesting salient feature is the hypocritical rhetorical spats between the US and China in recent weeks, which could set the undertone for US-Sino relations for years to come.

Snowden said his biggest fear is that nothing would change following his bold decision a year ago.

You can find the entire column here.