Tag Archives: CIA

CIA

Shhh… CIA Stand-down in Western Europe?

The CIA has undertaken an unprecedentedly long stand-down on friendly Western European allies following the recent furor in the aftermath of an exposed German agent and accumulated impacts from the Snowden revelations in order to re-examine its strategy, according to current and former US officials, which if true would prove an unfortunate timing for the United States given its concerns about Europe’s response to Russian aggression and monitoring of European extremists in Syria.

The so-called pause means CIA officers based in Europe have to withdraw covert clandestine meetings to gather intelligence from their well-placed sources, or roping in new recruits for that matter, though they are not barred from meeting their counterparts in the host country and conduct joint operations with host country services, according to the Associated Press.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper reportedly said Thursday that the US is assuming more risks given its pullback from spying on “specific targets”.

The stand-down was part of the fallout from the July 2 arrest of a 31-year old employee of the German intelligence service who later confessed he worked for the CIA. The CIA station chief in Berlin was (unprecedentedly) forced out of Germany a few days later, which underscored the German stance on the US who have already been stung from earlier Snowden revelations that the NSA had been tapping on the mobile phone of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

While such halts are common after an operation was compromised they were “never this long or this deep”, which has been in effect for about 2 months now.

Now the question is, would a NSA stand-down follow? Bet not and probably never.

CIA-ClandestineOps

Shhh… CIA’s Declassified Archives – Highlight American Vulnerabilities

The US Central Intelligence Agency released on Thursday a trove of newly declassified “Studies in Intelligence” documents on its homepage.

The move was the result of a long-running lawsuit between the agency and a former employee Jeffrey Scudder – according to the Washington Post (see video clip below) – whose CIA stint includes a 2-year spell looking after the agency’s historical files which ultimately ended his CIA career after he submitted a request under the Freedom of Information Act to release records of old clandestine operations he believed should have been made public.

Amongst the 249 documents released, spanning from the 1970s to 2000s, there’s one labeled “Analyzing Economic Espionage” which attempts to examine foreign intelligence operations against US economic interests beyond the scope and threats of technological advances – including the focus on certain traits of Americans that make them vulnerable to foreign agents, ie. resulting in a threat to the US.

“Foreign intelligence services are more inclined to operate against American targets outside the US” and “some intelligence services that stop short of recruiting US citizens use intelligence operatives to elicit information from them; the targeted American is unwitting of his interlocutor’s intelligence connection”.

CIAclassified

The 7-page document listed “certain personality attributes that increase our vulnerability”:

- Americans like to talk. We tend to be sociable and gregarious, even with casual contacts. We want to be liked, especially by foreigners, because many of us are still trying to overcome an “ugly American” complex. We place a higher premium on candor than on guile, on trust than on discretion.

- Many Americans do not know foreign languages, which in some respects puts them at a disadvantage when living in foreign countries. This does not mean we are “innocents abroad,” but it may make us less likely to pick up clues of suspicious behavior. Americans who do not know the language of a given country may forget that nationals of that country in a position to overhear their conversations often do know English.

- Many Americans are ambitious, oriented toward job advancement and professional recognition. Inevitably, some morally weak individuals are willing to sacrifice personal integrity in pursuit of their career goals.

AllThePresident'sMen

Shhh… Obama’s CIA Watergate?

This year August 9 marked the day Richard Milhous Nixon resigned as the 37th US President back in 1974 and the Discovery channel aptly aired its documentary “All the President’s Men Revisited” that day to mark the 40th anniversary of the Watergate.

Redford-Hoffman

I watched the 1976 classic “All the President’s Men” countless times during my newsroom days as a commercial crimes investigative reporter – and eventually won the 2005 SOPA award for one of my exposé thanks to this inspiring and fascinating “violent” movie, as Robert Redford the narrator in the documentary put it.

And I can’t help wondering: does the movie have any relevance today?

Obviously President Barack Obama is not President Nixon. The former has not been impeached like the latter. But the recent CIA spying on the Senate is exactly the present day equivalent, with some cyber elements of course, of the Watergate break-in.

Professor Bruce Ackerman of Yale University is right when he wrote that Obama “is wrong to support the limited response of his CIA director, John Brennan, who is trying to defer serious action by simply creating an “accountability panel” to consider “potential disciplinary measures” or “systemic issues.””

CIA Director John Brennan apologized to the Senate Intelligence Committee earlier this month when he admitted his agency not only spied on computers used by its staffers but also read the emails of the Senate investigators involved in investigating the controversial post 9/11 CIA interrogation and detention program.

Senate committee members were certainly not impressed even though Obama continued to support Brennan as a “man of great integrity”.

With continued failure to live up to his promise of a more transparent government, Obama is increasingly tainting his leadership to put himself in the history books for all the wrong reasons – probably not as bad as Nixon but only time will tell.

Shhh… CIA Style Manual? For Those Who Inspire to Write Like a Spy

It looks like the US intelligence agency takes writing very seriously – the picture below says it, “the security of our nation depends on it”.

CIAreport

Wonder if the CIA hired John le Carre to write this style guide and if the great spy novelist endorsed it if it was otherwise. Check out the 190-page manual here.

cat-writing

Oh btw you can tweet to the PR-savvy agency @CIA

Post-Snowden, the US Reaps a Security Whirlwind

Post-Snowden, the US Reaps a Security Whirlwind

From China with Love

It’s the one year anniversary of what is now known as the Snowden revelations, which appeared on June 5 and June 9 when The Guardian broke news of classified National Security Agency documents and Edward Snowden revealed himself in Hong Kong as the source of those leaks.

There is still much to decipher from the chronology of events in the aftermath and the sudden global awakening to the end of privacy. Among the impacts on the personal, business and political fronts, one interesting salient feature is the hypocritical rhetorical spats between the US and China in recent weeks, which could set the undertone for US-Sino relations for years to come.

Snowden said his biggest fear is that nothing would change following his bold decision a year ago.

You can find the entire column here.

More US Cyber-Spying?

More US Cyber-Spying?

Defense Secretary Hagel Faces a Tough Time Explaining This to China

US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced at the National Security Agency headquarters last Friday that the Pentagon would triple its cyber security staff – to 6,000 – over the next few years to defend against computer-based attacks.

That’s great. I wonder how Hagel is going to face the music when he visits China later this week where he expects to be grilled on the latest NSA revelations and aggressive US cyber spying. Just last month, it was revealed that the NSA has for years assessed the networks of Chinese telecommunications company Huawei, which the US House of Representatives has long advocated that US companies should avoid on the grounds of national security.

Find out more from my latest column here and there.

Coping With Offline Snoops

Latest NSA Revelations Not the End of the World

The latest NSA revelations about their ability to penetrate into computers that are not even connected to the Internet may have caused deep concerns but there are at least 2 defensive measures one can undertake.

You can find out more from my latest column here.

The Walls that Spy

Bad news for those who say ‘If only the walls could talk’. They can.

Hotel rooms are never safe havens as spies know only too well, but warnings of the risk often fall on deaf ears, to the sorrow or sometimes embarrassment of the tenants. Two recent news stories and the episode that I describe below hopefully change the public perceptions.

The stories describe how the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has traced and wiretapped top diplomats in their hotel suites over the past three years through its secret “Royal Concierge” program, which tracked some 350 hotels across the world, according to documents exposed by the former US intelligence contractor turned fugitive Edward Snowden.

Separately, it emerged in media reports last week that US President Barack Obama takes extreme measures to ward off any threats of secret video or audio surveillance by setting up an anti-spy portable tent in his hotel suite when traveling abroad, including in allied countries that the US allegedly targeted in conducting massive surveillance against foreign leaders and citizens. That amplifies the deep US concerns about being spied upon as much as spying on its friends and risks inviting potential hypocritical labeling of the White House.

I have written previously about the risk but there is much more than meets the eye, including an interesting exchange I once had with a foreign agent about the spy trade and hotel room risks.

Please find the entire column here and there.

Security Lapse at the EU Summit

Security officials leave an easily tapped device in closed-door conferences of European leaders

In photos made public of several closed-door bilateral meetings between various European leaders last week, there were two common denominators. One was the presence of the French President Francois Hollande. The other was the VoIP phone on the desk. The question is: What is that phone doing there?

In the middle of a major brouhaha over charges that the US National Security Agency had allegedly monitored the phone conversations of foreign diplomats, the officials in those photos were speaking to each other in the presence of this easily-tapped device.

What these these photos highlight is a security lapse, thus generating many questions: What else have European countries missed and not done to better protect their leaders from American or any eavesdropping?

You can find the entire column here and there.

Was Edward Snowden A Spy?

Or was Dick Cheney looking for a cheap excuse to play politics?

Edward Snowden with his sudden departure from Hong Kong for Moscow and eventually elsewhere, possibly a country hostile to the US, would reignite the question if he’s a spy or double agent.

But the allegations made last week by former US vice president Dick Cheney that the National Security Agency whistle-blower Edward Snowden could be a spy for China is off track, and he knows it, and are a deliberate public distraction as the Obama administration searches for scapegoats in the midst of defending the NSA surveillance programs with their one and only trump card.

Snowden left with his passport annulled, a warrant on his head plus criminal charges of espionage, theft and communicating classified intelligence to unauthorized persons.

But here is the dichotomy: While the corporate world is still coping with US regulations on better corporate governance practices, where does the notion of whistleblowing stand right now?

Please read the entire column here.

The Enemies of the US

Take your pick: Edward Snowden, Internet and phone service providers, or just everybody?

The furor over the past week about how US intelligence agencies like the National Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have for years scooped up massive loads of private communications data raises one critical and distressing question.

Who, worldwide and in the US, are the general public supposed to trust now that it seems all forms of digital and cyber communications risk being read by the American authorities? The Americans, it seems, don’t believe it’s that big a deal. By 62-34, according to the latest poll by Pew Research and the Washington Post, they say it’s more important to investigate the threats than protect their privacy. But what about the rest of the world?

The immediate acknowledgement, rather than point blank denial, of the massive clandestine eavesdropping programs is no doubt alarming even for those long suspicious of such covert undertakings. But the more disturbing part is that the official response amounts to plain outright lies.

Please read this entire Opinion Column here.

DIY Counter Espionage

Spying on Spies

The FBI probe into the scandal involving former CIA director David Petraeus and his mistress may have stolen global headlines the past week.

But there is something else the FBI knows that should warrant more attention. Something closer to those of us less exalted than the boss of the world’s most famous spy agency.

The FBI is known to have video footage, covertly taken in a hotel room somewhere in China, showing how Chinese agents broke in and swept through the belongings and laptop of an American businessman.

There were recent media reports of similar incidents. The FBI is now showing the clip as a warning to corporate security experts of major US companies.

The FBI also warned some months ago about the risks of using hotel wi-fi networks and recommended all government officials, businessmen and academic personnel take extra caution when traveling abroad.

Whilst the corporate world is often most at risks, the average citizens are also highly vulnerable, especially to electronic surveillance on home and foreign soil.

So what can one do to protect the personal data and business secrets on the computers, especially when traveling abroad?

Please read full article here and there.

Spy Game: Kids for Tricks

The First World’s Version of Child Soldiers?

It is estimated that 250,000 children are fighting in wars all over the world, recruited by force or lured by the false promise of an escape from poverty. They are living a life no child should ever lead.

But across the planet, another crop of children, living in affluence in Cupertino, California, or Knightsbridge in London, or Berlin are being recruited as child soldiers. They won’t bear arms. They won’t nudge from their posts – usually in their parents’ back bedrooms.

On Halloween, while their peers are wearing goblin costumes and going from door to door, their families might regard them as hiding in their bedrooms and staying away from trouble.

But so you thought. They may be in much bigger trouble than you could ever imagine – they could be on a Wanted List from intelligence agencies – for hire. But in their teen years, are they capable of making the moral decisions to take up spying, any more than a 12 year old peering over the sights of a Kalashnikov in Sierra Leone?

Read the full article here.

How to Beat the CIA and Protect Your Data

A little secret and long overdue column – as I have promised some weeks ago.

How about leading a cyber lifestyle without the risks of compromising your computer, privacy and precious confidential data… ie. your life?!

There’s an easy solution and you do not have to be a computer expert. But the CIA, MI6, etc, wouldn’t want you to know the trick… because you can beat those spies and hackers by going online and leaving no trace.

Read the full article here.