BrowseAnonymously2

Shhh… Privacy: Tor Guide on Browsing Anonymously

Here’s an interesting chart on how to use Tor to browse the web anonymously:

TorInfographics

The Tor Project is a free software and an open network that shields your online identity and thus helps you maintain privacy by defending against network surveillance:

But Tor can still be compromised and multiple layers of security is recommended:

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FlashlightApp

Shhh… Top 10 Flashlight Apps Major Privacy Breach & Windfall for CyberCriminals

“I think this is bigger than Ebola right now because 500 million people are infected and they don’t know it. But it’s not them, it’s their smartphone,” said Gary Miliefsky, CEO of SnoopWall, a counterveillance software company focused on helping consumers and enterprises protect their privacy on all of their computing devices including smartphones, tablets and laptops.

“The top 10 flashlight apps today that you can download from the Google Play Store are all malware. They’re malicious, they’re spying, they’re snooping and they’re stealing.”

The personal data stolen from our smartphones – including contacts, emails, messages, bank account details, photos, video, etc – are then sold to cybercriminals in 3 countries: China, India and Russia, according to Miliefsky, a founding member of the US Department of Homeland Security who has advised two White House Administrations on cybersecurity matters.

More information below from SnoopWall press release:

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DropBox

Shhh… Dropbox Hacked?

Dropbox reportedly “appears” to have been hacked after anonymous hackers claimed to have compromised some 7 million accounts with several hundreds of usernames and passwords leaked in plain text so far, and with full leak promised if they received donations to their bitcoin address.

Dropbox, however, has denied claims of any data breach:

“Dropbox has not been hacked. These usernames and passwords were unfortunately stolen from other services and used in attempts to log in to Dropbox accounts. We’d previously detected these attacks and the vast majority of the passwords posted have been expired for some time now. All other remaining passwords have been expired as well.”

Advice: Change your password immediately. And just like the recent iCloud hack, think hard before you post anything personal and confidential online.

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Google-JapanDoraemon

Shhh… Japan’s “Forget” Ruling on Google

The Tokyo District Court ordered Google Japan last Thursday to follow Europe’s recent “right to be forgotten” ruling and remove the search results of a Japanese man’s past relations with a criminal organization following his complaint of violation into his privacy.

According to the judge preceding the case, some of the Google results “infringe personal rights” and had harmed the plaintiff.

The European Court of Justice ruled in May that anyone living in the European Union and Europeans living outside the region could ask search engines to remove links if they believed the online contents breached their right to privacy and are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed.”

But despite the uproar and headlines in the aftermath, the dirty little secret is that nothing has really changed. What Google has effectively done is to remove results from name search of those names approved to be deleted but only on its European websites. The same results remain on the Google US homepage and all its non-European sites.

Furthermore, Google is only removing the results but not the links. Its European sites may have deleted the results for a search on a specific name but a search for the same name accompanied by other key words may still churn out the same results.

In an earlier Shhh-cretly column, I explained with examples why there is a limit on the extent of privacy and any attempt to manually and selectively remove the Google search contents, successful or otherwise, is like playing God.

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Snowden-UKobserverIdeas2014

Shhh… Snowden Attacks UK’s “Anything Goes” Privacy Intrusions

In his first UK public appearance via satellite link from Moscow at the Observer Ideas festival on Sunday, Edward Snowden warned that British spy agencies are using digital technology to conduct mass population surveillance without any checks and balances at all and thus overreaching and encroaching on privacy rights in a way that he characterized as even worse than the US NSA had managed.

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nsa-facebook

Shhh… NSA Disguised as Facebook Servers

The National Security Agency has been disguising itself as Facebook servers in order to gain access to the computers of intelligence targets, according to a new report by The Intercept:

“In one man-on-the-side technique, codenamed QUANTUMHAND, the agency disguises itself as a fake Facebook server. When a target attempts to log in to the social media site, the NSA transmits malicious data packets that trick the target’s computer into thinking they are being sent from the real Facebook. By concealing its malware within what looks like an ordinary Facebook page, the NSA is able to hack into the targeted computer and covertly siphon out data from its hard drive.”

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Snowden-CitizenFour

Shhh… Laura Poitras’ Documentary “CitizenFour” on Snowden Revelation to be Released

Mark your calendar. The 24th of October has been set for the official release of “Citizenfour”, a long anticipated ground-breaking documentary by Laura Poitras, premiered at the New York Film Festival on Friday night, which reveals a behind-the-scene and intimate portrait of Edward Snowden and his leak of NSA documents as it unfolded at the Mira hotel in Hong Kong last year.

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Poitras and former Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald flew from New York to Hong Kong early June 2013 to meet Snowden for the first time. This documentary captures minute by minute their tense initial encounters and the many days of questioning, cross-examining and waiting for the Guardian greenlight to their explosive exposé that changed the world to this day.

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CitizenB-NGF

Shhh-cretly Featured in “Citizen B”: A Documentary on Surveillance & Privacy

Shhh-cretly was interviewed by renowned and award-winning director Werner Boote, who was in Hong Kong with his Austrian crew this week to film Citizen B, a 90-minute documentary on surveillance and privacy to be released in 2015.

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GoogleHacked

Shhh… iCloud Hack Victims to Sue Google for $100 million

Photo credit: http://www.pitstopmedia.com/

Hollywood lawyer Marty Singer, of Los Angeles-based law firm Lavely & Singer, has written to Google chairman Eric Schmidt and founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin threatening to sue Google for US$100 million if the US search giant failed to remove the naked photos of their clients that were recently hacked and posted online.

Their clients include a dozen of Hollywood celebrities like Kate Upton, Amber Heard, Rihanna, Jennifer Lawrence, Ariana Grande and Cara Delevingne whose nude photos have been hacked and distributed online after hackers took advantage of a flaw in Apple’s password recovery system to gain access to their iCloud accounts.

Singer has accused Google of “blatantly unethical behavior” – as takedown requests were sent to the company days after the photos were leaked but those images remained on YouTube and blogs – and its failure “to act expeditiously, and responsibly to remove the images, but in knowingly accommodating, facilitating, and perpetuating the unlawful conduct. Google is making millions and profiting from the victimization of women”.

“The seriousness of this matter cannot be overstated. If Google continues to thumb its nose at my clients’ rights – and continues to both allow and facilitates the further victimization of these women – and disregards the demands of this letter, it does so at its own peril,” according to the letter (see below).

Google is no stranger to takedown requests.

A landmark ruling that originated from a Spanish court has led the European Court of Justice to rule last May that anyone living in the European Union and Europeans living outside the region could ask search engines to remove links if they believed the online contents breached their right to privacy and are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed”.

Following this controversial European “right to be forgotten” ruling, Google has started removing results from its search engine since late June.

Hacked celebrities threaten to sue

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M16-newM

Shhh… MI6 New M is (Alex) Younger

Career intelligence officer Alex Younger is the new chief of MI6 Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), according to the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Friday.

The 51-year old Younger is now the new “M”, popularized in James Bond movies but otherwise known as “C” after the first head Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming, replacing Sir John Sawers who is stepping down after 5 years as chief of the country’s spy agency. The appointment is a sign of continuity of policy and strategy as Younger has served as the right-hand man for Sawers.

Younger has oversaw the agency’s worldwide intelligence operations the past 2 years. He had overseas postings in Europe and the Middle East and was the senior SIS officer in Afghanistan. He also led MI6′s work on counter-terrorism in the run up to the London Olympic Games 2012, according to the FCO.

The SIS, commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6), is the British intelligence agency that supplies foreign intelligence to the British government. It was founded in 1909 and currently employs around 3,200 people with its headquarters in Vauxhall Cross, central London.

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HKprotests3

Shhh… Phone Apps Disguised to Spy on Hong Kong Protesters

With the widespread use of social media during the week-long protests in Hong Kong, including attempts to find phone apps capable of defying potential shutdown of the power grid, this story from The Associated Press below (Credits to The Associated Press) is a timely stern reminder:

The Associated Press
Published: October 2, 2014

HONG KONG — The Chinese government might be using smartphone apps to spy on pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, a U.S. security firm said.

The applications are disguised as tools created by activists, said the firm, Lacoon Mobile Security. It said that once downloaded, they give an outsider access to the phone’s address book, call logs and other information.

The identities of victims and details of the servers used “lead us to believe that the Chinese government are behind the attack,” said a Lacoon statement.

China is, along with the United States and Russia, regarded as a leader in cyber warfare research. Security experts say China is a leading source of hacking attacks aimed at foreign governments and companies to computers in China.

The Chinese government has denied engaging in cyberspying and says China is among the biggest victims of hacking attacks.

Lacoon said it found two similar “malicious, fake” apps that appeared to be related. One targets phones that run Apple Inc.’s iOS operating system; the other is meant for phones using Google Inc.’s Android system.

The “very advanced software,” known as an mRAT, or multidimensional requirements analysis tool, “is undoubtedly being backed by a nation state,” the company said. Lacoon said it was calling the software Xsser.

“The Xsser mRAT represents a fundamental shift by nation-state cybercriminals from compromising traditional PC systems to targeting mobile devices,” the company said.

Such “cross-platform attacks” that target both Apple and Android phones are rare, which adds to signs a government is involved, Lacoon said. It said the app might be the first spyware for iOS created by a Chinese government entity.

In May, U.S. prosecutors charged five Chinese military officers with cyberspying and stealing trade secrets from major American companies. A security firm, Mandiant, said last year it traced attacks on American and other companies to a military unit in Shanghai.

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Emmys

Shhh… The Guardian Bagged An Emmy

Congratulations to The Guardian for winning an Emmy award in New York Tuesday night for its groundbreaking coverage on the Snowden revelations.

The multimedia interactive feature NSA Decoded by The Guardian emerged the winner in the new approaches: current news category at the news and documentary Emmy awards.

The interactive coverage, which includes interviews and discussions with key players like journalist Glenn Greenwald, former NSA employees, senators and members of US congress, helps the audience understand the facts and implications of Edward Snowden’s disclosures last year about the NSA’s mass surveillance program.

The Guardian has also won in April, along with the Washington Post, the Pulitzer prize for public service for their groundbreaking coverage of the Snowden revelations.

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TimBerners-Lee

Shhh… Tim Berners-Lee on the Web & Privacy

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the web 25 years ago and director of the World Wide Web Consortium, spoke at the Web We Want Festival last Saturday whereby he, according to The Guardian, also called on Saturday for a bill of rights that would guarantee the independence of the internet and ensure users’ privacy.

“If a company can control your access to the internet, if they can control which websites they go to, then they have tremendous control over your life,” the British computer scientist said. “If a government can block you going to, for example, the opposition’s political pages, then they can give you a blinkered view of reality to keep themselves in power.

“Suddenly the power to abuse the open internet has become so tempting both for government and big companies.”

Below is Tim Berners-Lee at a TED Talk earlier this year.

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CarmenSegarra

Shhh… The Secret Tapes of Goldman Sachs by Carmen Segarra

In what could be equivalent to a nuclear bomb on Wall Street, former New York Federal Reserve Examiner Carmen Segarra has released some 46 hours worth of voice recordings, secretly taped with a small recorder on her keychain in 2012, that purportedly show bank regulators going soft and cozy with banking giant Goldman Sachs at a time when the New York Fed was expected to become a stronger regulator after the financial crisis of 2008.

To demonstrate a case in point from the recordings: “We’re looking at a transaction that’s legal but shady,” according to a New York Fed staffer in reference to a proposed Goldman Sachs financial transaction.

The secret recordings – released to both a reporter for ProPublica and radio program This American Life – show an unwillingness among some Fed supervisors to both demand specific information from Goldman about a transaction with Banco Santander and to strongly criticize what Segarra concluded was the lack of an appropriate conflict-of-interest policy at Goldman.

Segarra, who later suited the New York Fed for wrongful termination after her refusal to alter a critical examination of Goldman’s legal and compliance units, said her colleagues were too soft on those kinds of transactions and the banking industry in general.

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Phone-encrypt

Shhh… Apple & Google Phones Too Secure?

This may as well be the best ever advertisement any company would die for…

FBI director James Comey criticized on Thursday that the encryption in the latest operating systems of Apple and Google phones were so secure that law enforcement officials would have no access to information stored on those devices even with valid warrants and asked why companies would “market something expressly to allow people to place themselves beyond the law”.

“There will come a day when it will matter a great deal to the lives of people … that we will be able to gain access,” Mr Comey reportedly told the media.

“I want to have that conversation [with companies responsible] before that day comes.”

Law enforcement agencies place premiums on their forensic abilities to search sensitive data like photos, messages and web histories on smartphones – and also on old plain vanilla cellular phones to some extent – to solve some serious crimes: mobile phones increasingly perform and even replace what we used to do with our computers but thanks to the convergence of technologies, law enforcement and investigators are now able to use mobile phone forensic, much like computer forensic techniques, to retrieve data, including deleted data, from the phones as they did on computers.

The comments from Comey came hot on the heels of news last week that Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, is so well encrypted that even Apple Inc. cannot unlock their mobile devices. Google meanwhile is also adopting its latest encryption format for its new (to be released) Android operating system that the company would be unable to unlock.

Question: Has Comey approached the NSA for help?

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Snowden-RightLivlihhood

Shhh… Snowden Won Right Livelihood Award

The former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has received Wednesday the Right Livelihood Honorary Award – also known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize” – from the Stockholm-based Right Livelihood Award Foundation for his work on press freedom and “for his courage and skill in revealing the unprecedented extent of state surveillance violating basic democratic processes and constitutional rights.”

Alan Rusbridger, editor-in-chief of the British newspaper The Guardian with whom Snowden collaborated to publish what became known today as the Snowden revelations, also won the award for “responsible journalism in the public interest.

Both Snowden and Rusbridger are honorary winners, meaning they will not receive the award’s customary 500,000 kronor (54,500 euros) but the foundation said it would fund legal support for Snowden, who has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize to be announced later this year.

The Swiss attorney general has reportedly said earlier this month that Snowden could receive Swiss asylum if he opts to travel to Switzerland to testify against the National Security Agency.

The Right Livelihood Award was created in 1980 by German-Swedish philanthropist Jakob von Uexkull to “honour and support those offering practical and exemplary answers to the most urgent challenges facing us today”.

Three other prize winners, named to receive the monetary award, are Pakistani human rights lawyer Asma Jahanger, Sri Lankan rights activist Basil Fernando and US environmentalist Bill McKibbben.

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BenjaminNetanyahu

Shhh… Israeli Spooks Against Spying Palestinians for the US

Some 43 veterans of Israel’s secret spy agency Unit 8200 has written an open letter of protest to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and head of the Israeli army accusing the agency of targeting and collecting data of innocent Palestinians for political and not national security purposes, adding that they have a “moral duty” not to “take part in the state’s actions against Palestinians”.

This relates well to a New York Times article last week about how the special relationship between the US and Israel – including how the NSA shared “unminimized”, ie. raw data (on Arab-and Palestinian-Americans with relatives in Israel and the Palestinian territories) with Israel unlike the sharing of only “minimized” data with other countries – has motivated Edward Snowden to blow the whistle last year.

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Columnist, Writer, Sleuth – Vanson Soo